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Acid Gas Disposal

This patented process developed by Mr. Frank Eaton and licensed by Master Corporation allows processors to dispose of acid gas more easily and inexpensively than most do now.

Whenever a field with sour hydrocarbons is developed, especially in the case of natural gas, two major problems must be solved. The first is the economic removal of the sour components (H2S and CO2) from the hydrocarbon stream. The second, addressed by our process, is the economic disposal of the sour elements.

Removing the sour components is accomplished with a solvent absorption process. This is normally accomplished with an amine (i.e. DGA or DEA) treating system. The solvent must then be stripped of the H2S and CO2 in the regeneration section of the treating system. The resulting, water saturated, sour mix or acid gas is then sent to a sulfur recovery unit (SRU) where a catalyst is used to convert the H2S to elemental sulfur at a 95 to 99% efficiency. The remaining effluent is incinerated with resulting byproducts being vented. If the acid gas is high purity CO2 it is simply vented to the atmosphere.

Typically, SRUs require a lengthy permitting process, are relatively expensive to build and operate, and present operating difficulties. Since CO2 is a "greenhouse" gas, its release into the atmosphere may soon be restricted as a contributor to global warming.

Rather than make SRUs more economical, more efficient or easier to operate, we took a "zero" emissions approach.

The process eliminates the need for a Sulfur Recovery Unit, does not require intermediate dehydration of the compressed acid gas and utilizes the SWD utility, common with most gas plants, needed to dispose of process and produced water. The quantity of water is small compared to existing disposal technologies but larger quantities can be injected if they are available and require disposal.

The cost to build an injection facility of this type is much lower than for a SRU. An additional benefit is a much shorter permitting time.

Unlike a sulfur plant, our process is not rate sensitive, meaning increases or decreases in acid gas flow rates do not necessitate operator adjustments to the system.

The use of materials resistant to the corrosive elements ensures system dependability and makes it much more economical to operate.



Acid Gas Disposal System
Disclosures made herin are covered by
US Patent Number 6,149,344